During COVID-19 pandemic, we offer in-person, telephone & virtual meetings 7 days a week.

Dr. Cassidy Blair, Psy.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist | PSY 22022

Dr. Cassidy Blair, Psy.D.

Senior Citizens Loneliness and Isolation – Part 2
Senior Citizens: Loneliness and Isolation – Part 2

In the previous installment, a number of problems for senior citizens relating to their loneliness and isolation were presented and discussed, among which were higher mortality, a deterioration of the cognitive functions, and elder abuse. This list, however, goes on:

 

Because traditionally, they have had limited immediate and extended family contacts, members of the LGBT communities also tend to be socially isolated. LGBT seniors typically live alone and do not have children, and, due to previous social ostracism associated with being discovered to be LGBT, they have often been estranged from their immediate families. Among many sectors of the society, there is still strong prejudice and discrimination against LGBT people, and these facts also mitigate against the development of many general social contacts. Since the normalization of gay relationships and gay marriage, many of these prejudices against LGBT people have been somewhat reduced, but LGBT individuals still have many problems associated with loneliness and isolation.

 

Many senior citizens are experiencing significant health problems with long-term illnesses, and these illnesses also have the effect of limiting the individual’s accessibility to form and continue social activities. Such long-term illnesses as arthritis, chronic lung diseases, depression, and mobility problems ca all have the effect of limiting social contacts and interpersonal relationships. The formation and continuation of close interpersonal relationships are adversely affected by long-term illnesses.

 

As noted above, loneliness and isolation can contribute to risk factors for the development of depression. Depression, further, can be associated with lowered resistance to disease and increased motivations towards suicide, both significant problems for senior citizens.

Loneliness and isolation are associated with high blood pressure. Focusing primarily on systolic blood pressure, this characteristic cuts across all categories, gender, race, ethnicity, Thus, like having pets, having social contacts and relationships can contribute to lower blood pressure.

 

Social isolation and loneliness contributes to lowered expectations and pessimism towards the future. Thus, socially isolated and lonely senior citizens have more restricted ideas of a future for themselves than do senior citizens with significant social contacts and relationships. They express more concern for their abilities to continue to care for themselves and to find assistance and relief from community-based programs.

 

There are often physical barriers mitigating against the development and continuation of close personal friendships and relationships for senior citizens.Geographic and physical isolation leads to social isolation and loneliness. When family and friends live far away or the personal transport capabilities of the senior citizens are severely limited, the senior citizen often has no alternative to social isolation and loneliness. Research has demonstrated that in the U.S., one in six seniors confront these problems of geographical or physical isolation. Associated with these problems of location are matters of personal security and the accessibility of needed services, such as medical care, food, or housing. While many senior citizens express a desire for independent living, this does not necessarily also mean that they are desirous of physical separation, social isolation, and loneliness.

 

If you are a senior citizen experiencing problems associated with loneliness and isolation, communication with a psychologist may provide for therapeutic, non-risky social contact. Further, the psychologist can provide input, advice, and assistance i circumstances of mental and physical deterioration, cognitive deterioration, and problems of elder abuse. Contact with a psychologist can open up new opportunities for positive social contact and interaction necessary and beneficial to senior citizens.

 

 

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Related Blog

Healthy Steps Toward Overcoming Social Media Addiction

Like any Addiction Disorder, Social Media Addiction is a serious Mental Health Disorder with significant symptoms and consequences. Social Media Addiction is a form of behavioral addiction. Individuals with a Social Media Addiction struggle with uncontrollable urges to check social media, excessive concern regarding their online personas, and obsession over attention they receive or fail

Ways That Being Wealthy Can Affect Your Mental Health

Ways That Being Wealthy Can Affect Your Mental Health

Mental health is not an isolated experience. While Mental Health Conditions affect your thoughts and behaviors, they influence—and are influenced by—every aspect of life. Money is no exception. Wealth and mental health affect each other in unique, often detrimental ways. Money itself can create complications with symptoms or enable maladaptive coping behaviors. Additionally, wealthy people

Things To Know About Mentalization-Based Therapy

Psychotherapy describes various evidence-based treatment models that help clients work through specific mental health issues, navigate harmful thoughts and behaviors, build skills to improve daily functioning and make life more enjoyable. One form of Psychotherapy is Mentalization-Based Therapy (MBT). MBT revolves around the skill of mentalization, which allows you to identify and understand your emotional

Looking For a Local Psychologist?

We offer evening and weekend appointments for our concierge patients and all patients upon request. Call us today at 310-999-4996 to discuss how Blair Wellness Group can help you overcome
depression, anxiety, relationship issues, and other disorders.

Scroll to Top