Signs and Symptoms of Depression

 

Demonstrating or suffering from one or more of the following symptoms, signs, or behaviors for a good part of the day, virtually every day, for a period of at least two weeks or more may be a sign of depression:

 

  • Feelings of being anxious without any particular reason

  • Feelings of being “empty”

  • Pessimistic feelings

  • Feelings of hopelessness

  • Being irritable

  • Persistent guilt feelings

  • Feelings of helplessness

  • Feelings of being worthlessness

  • Loss of energy

  • Persistent fatigue

  • Slow thought or speech patterns

  • Restlessness or problems in sitting still

  • Problems with concentration

  • Memory problems

  • Trouble in making decisions

  • Difficulty in going to sleep and/or staying asleep for an extended period of time

  • Oversleeping

  • Weight loss or gain

  • Changes in appetite, depressed appetite

  • Recurring thoughts about death or suicide

  • Actual suicide attempts.

  • Persistent pains, aches, cramps, headaches, and/or digestive problems that have no particular physical cause, and which are not alleviated by medical treatment.

 

 

People suffering from depression do not ordinarily demonstrate all of these symptoms. While some people may experience several of the signs and symptoms, other people will demonstrate only a few, or just one or two. Accompanying the signs and symptoms is usually a “low” mood, a negative change in the enthusiasm for life. This is also a requirement for the diagnosis of a major Depressive Disorder.

 

 

Treatment for major Depressive Disorder ranges from psychological counseling to a variety of more active psychological therapies. Individuals suffering from just a few of the symptoms, but the symptoms are particularly distressing, while not in full major Depressive Disorder, can also benefit from psychological counseling.

Next:  More on depression